RelyEx Solutions

Drayage Brokersin San Francisco, CA

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Because a drayage load can mean a few different things, confusion among carriers is common. Many carriers link drayage with going into a port, but that isn't always true. While all drayage loads typically originate from a port of entry, there are often several legs of a drayage journey before a container turns up at its final stop. Legs of a drayage load may include:

Why Are Drayage Companies in San Francisco, CA So Important?

You may be thinking, what's so important about drayage? It's such a small step in the container storage transport process. In reality, it's an integral piece needed in the logistics industry and a crucial part of U.S. supply chain management.

To truly understand the importance of drayage, let's use flowers as an example. Most cut flower shipments enter the market from areas in South America until they end up at Dutch auction houses. Once there, wholesalers purchase flowers in bulk and send those products to retail outlets worldwide. Because flowers are perishable, they typically need to be refrigerated and are often shipped in reefer containers. These refrigerated vessels must maintain a certain temp to prevent loss.

Drayage companies like RelyEx allow flower shippers to send their products from Argentinian ports to airports in the Netherlands with peace of mind because their products are protected. The only way to accomplish this feat is with the help of swift, meticulous port drayage services. Drayage companies allow flower shippers to send their products from Argentinian ports to airports in the Netherlands with peace of mind, because their products are protected. The only way to accomplish this feat is with the help of swift, meticulous port drayage services.

If port drayage is compromised, it can cause delays and even fines. You know the packages you get delivered to your front door from apps like Amazon? Without drayage and drayage brokers, one or two-day shipping times wouldn't even be possible.

As a multi-billion-dollar industry in the U.S. alone, it seems like drayage shipping issues shouldn't exist. But the fact is inefficiencies and congestion are still major problems at ports. Whether it's a lack of carriers, absent chassis, or overburdened terminals, delays lead to missed deadlines, lost revenue, and worse.

But anytime challenges exist, so too do innovative solutions.

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RelyEx Solves Problems

At RelyEx, we like to consider ourselves problem solvers. The nature of the container drayage industry presents new challenges every day, but we're firm believers that there's a solution to every hurdle we encounter. And while some drayage businesses implement a reactive approach, RelyEx customers choose us for our proactive mindset. We take pride in solving your company's drayage challenges to help you avoid frustrating fees, missed expectations, and delayed shipments. We strive to make every transaction successful and streamlined by partnering with shippers who prioritize transparent, prompt, and accurate communication.

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RelyEx Has a Unique Vantage Point

RelyEx approaches your business from the customer's perspective - a unique approach that helps us provide high-quality, effective drayage services. We've been in the customers' shoes, know their pain points, and because of that, provide first-hand solutions to stressful supply chain issues. With over 30 years of collective knowledge, our team excels in:

  • Inventory Management
  • Logistics
  • Purchasing
  • Finance

Our varied, high-level drayage shipping experience helps us achieve our overarching goal: expertly managing your freight movement needs. That way, you can direct your time and focus on growing the core aspects of your business while we handle the heavy lifting. Throw in proactive planning to avoid bottleneck situations and strong communication for transparent customer relations, and you can see why so many companies trust RelyEx.

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RelyEx Nurtures Strong Carrier Relationships

When it comes to shipping logistics, it only takes one mistake by a mediocre worker to disrupt your business. That's why, at RelyEx, we pride ourselves on forming and nurturing relationships with carriers who match our standards of care. Our founding partner started his career transporting freight for companies as an on-demand carrier. He uses that knowledge to maximize the resources of our carriers so that our customer's expectations aren't just met - they're exceeded.

Based in the port city of San Francisco, RelyEx has a keen understanding of the challenges of managing the inbound and outbound flow of containers. Our team of container drayage experts provides your business with unique solutions to nuanced shipping problems, minimizing demurrage and ensuring the successful delivery of your freight.

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Customers choose RelyEx because:

  • We are a reliable drayage logistics partner that manages your freight from beginning to end
  • We have a rare industry vantage point with 30+ years of client-side experience
  • We foster and fortify the strongest vendor relations
  • We take a proactive approach to problem-solving, not a reactive approach
Let us know how we can help.
phone-number843-885-3082
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Your Drayage Shipments Managed from Start to Finish

Some drayage brokers don't care how customers feel about their service as long as they sign a contract and get paid. As a solutions-oriented team, RelyEx takes the opposite approach. We're motivated by the opportunity to overachieve for our customers and to provide them with the best logistics experience possible. With professional experience as carriers and shippers ourselves, we know the roadblocks and challenges you're facing. We excel at mapping out the best plans of action to solve those problems. But that's just the start.

Our tracking experts monitor and manage every aspect of your drayage shipment from booking to delivery, 24/7. Once booked, we look for the availability of your containers hourly once they're at port. When they arrive, our team acts quickly to access your storage containers when they're available.

Plus, RelyEx ensures your company's requirements are met by the carrier during loading and delivery and provide necessary documentation as fast as possible. With real-time tracking updates and access to our customer service professionals, your team has complete visibility throughout the shipping process.

We Source Top-Notch Operators at the Best Prices

Over the years, RelyEx has built a strong network of drayage carriers, transloading locations, and container storage spaces to provide you with the best possible options to match your drayage service needs. We know that searching for quality service presents an added layer of complexity and stress to our customers. That's why we work hard to take that off your plate by connecting you with our reliable shipping partners.

With a background moving freight as an on-demand carrier, our founding partner understands how to maximize the resources and equipment of our carriers to match your needs.

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We Make Transparent, Timely Communication a Priority

Like other industries, the global logistics space is complex. Mistakes will be made, and problems will happen. With those truths in mind, RelyEx has built its reputation as problem solvers. Unlike other drayage companies, we don't shy away from this industry's complexities because we take pride in solving problems. Even better, we aim to do what's needed to avoid those problems altogether.

As your logistics partner, we will provide your company with accurate, transparent, and prompt communication. If there are unexpected issues, we'll notify you immediately and will provide several options to remedy the problem. We even offer custom reporting for large clients who need at-the-moment updates and quick access to shipment documentation.

We Have Robust Project Management Experience

Why let the unpredictability of your industry dictate your success? With a background working in manufacturing, our founders are familiar with the demands of managing production schedules and sales orders. That experience makes it abundantly clear to us that every business and industry is different. If you struggle with seasonal surges or other factors, our team supports your business with a mapped-out plan and schedule, so you stay ahead of the game.

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Paperwork Errors

Typically, shippers need four specific documents to clear shipments through customs: A Bill of Lading (or BOL), a commercial invoice, a packing list, and an arrival notice. Seasoned drayage brokers like RelyEx are used to preparing these documents, but new shippers tend to miss this step due to inexperience.

Payment Delays

If a shipper only pays for part of their shipment, a vessel operator may refuse to release their freight until their bill is fully paid. Payment delays lead to cargo detention at the port of entry, which triggers demurrage charges.

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Documents Received Too Late

Paperwork is needed when you're shipping goods with a drayage company. When documents like the Certificate of Origin or Bill of Lading arrive at their destination late, you can expect demurrage fees. RelyEx avoids this situation entirely by being proactive when submitting paperwork.

Additional causes for demurrage fees can include:

  • Damaged Container Storage
  • Custom Released Containers
  • Storage Containers Are Too Heavy

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RelyEx:

The Supply Chain Partner You Can Count On

At RelyEx, we know first-hand how stressful supply chain problems can be for business owners. Though drayage shipping might seem minor on the surface, it affects every stage of your shipping process. And when inevitable hurdles manifest, RelyEx propels you over the proverbial roadblocks with a proactive mindset and a passion for challenging projects. We believe that all problems have a solution, and our unique vantage point allows us to provide first-hand solutions to customers in a wide array of industries.

When it comes to your business, don't settle for anything less than RelyEx. Contact our office today to learn more about how we make your shipping experience streamlined and stress-free.

phone-number843-885-3082

Latest News in San Francisco, CA

How have Warriors changed since Draymond Green’s suspension?

The early returns are in on the Golden State Warriors’ new starting lineup.Promoting Brandin Podziemski and Jonathan Kuminga to the unit has injected life to the offense, but not enough to offset the ...

The early returns are in on the Golden State Warriors’ new starting lineup.

Promoting Brandin Podziemski and Jonathan Kuminga to the unit has injected life to the offense, but not enough to offset the decline in defense without Draymond Green and Andrew Wiggins.

What’s clear, however, is that the unit has steadied Golden State as it navigates the indefinite suspension of Green. The addition of Podziemski, a relentless 20-year-old rookie guard, and Kuminga, an electric 21-year-old forward, alongside Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Kevon Looney has coincided with the Warriors’ best stretch since opening the season 6-2.

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Golden State’s loss to the defending-champion Nuggets on Monday dropped them back to .500 for the season after going 5-2 since Green was suspended for a wild swing at the Suns’ Jusuf Nurkic on Dec. 12.

It was just his sixth game since returning from a five-game suspension for putting the Timberwolves’ Rudy Gobert in a headlock.

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Comparing Golden State’s last stretch with Green to its recent run without him provides a snapshot of how the team has changed in his absence.

The new starting lineup’s offensive rating, or points per 100 possessions, leaped by 14.9 points, while its defensive rating dipped by 15.8. While the change in net rating is negligible, the new lineup’s assist-to-turnover ratio improved more than twice over, from 1.36-1 to 2.94-1.

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Widen the scope beyond the starters, and it’s evident that they’re playing cleaner basketball. The Warriors were 28th in the NBA in assist-to-turnover ratio in Green’s last six games; they rank 14th since he was suspended. Over the same periods, they went from an NBA-worst 23.2 personal fouls per game to 10th best at 18.4 — a number that would look even better had they not picked up 23 fouls and sent Nikola Jokic to the line 18 times in their 120-114 loss to Denver.

Other notable trends, comparing the Warriors’ recent seven games without Green to their last six with him:

Reach Jon Schultz: jon.schultz@sfchronicle.com

What's in store for rest of Giants' offseason?

This story was excerpted from the Giants Beat newsletter. To read the full newsletter, click here. And subscribe to get it regularly in your inbox.Happy holidays!The 2023 season didn’t play out the way the Giants expected, but they’re determined to make substantive changes to ensu...

This story was excerpted from the Giants Beat newsletter. To read the full newsletter, click here. And subscribe to get it regularly in your inbox.

Happy holidays!

The 2023 season didn’t play out the way the Giants expected, but they’re determined to make substantive changes to ensure they not only put themselves in position to contend next year, but also field a far more entertaining team that will resonate with fans. They began the retooling process by bringing in Bob Melvin to serve as their new manager and then made their first big offseason splash by inking KBO star Jung Hoo Lee to a six-year, $113 million deal.

Still, there are plenty of holes left to be filled, especially since the Giants will be charged with contending with the Shohei Ohtani-led Dodgers, the star-driven Padres and the rising D-backs in 2024.

“We’ve talked about wanting to be motivated to improve our team,” president of baseball operations Farhan Zaidi said earlier this month. “Certainly making acquisitions that get our fans excited is really important. But making acquisitions that excite people in the moment but then wind up not panning out, that’s not going to be good business either. We’re just going to continue to rely heavily on our evaluations and players that we think can really move the needle for us.”

Here’s a look at where the Giants stand as they prepare to ring in the new year:

Biggest question to answer before Spring Training: Which other impact players can they land this offseason? The Giants showed they could successfully woo a top free agent by signing the 25-year-old Lee, but they’ll need to continue beefing up their roster to keep pace in the competitive National League West. They lost Japanese stars Ohtani and Yoshinobu Yamamoto to the Dodgers, but they could pivot to other free agents such as Blake Snell, Jordan Montgomery, Shota Imanaga, Matt Chapman or Rhys Hoskins. The Giants could also try delving into the trade market, where other potential fits such as Corbin Burnes and Willy Adames of the Brewers, Dylan Cease of the White Sox and Ha-Seong Kim of the Padres could be available.

One player poised to have a breakout season: LHP Kyle Harrison Harrison, who is ranked the Giants’ No. 1 prospect by MLB Pipeline, experienced some growing pains after breaking into the Majors in 2023, but he delivered one of the most electric performances of the year when he struck out 11 over 6 1/3 scoreless innings in his home debut against the Reds. The Giants believe the 22-year-old southpaw has all the necessary tools to develop into a frontline starter, so if he can take another step forward in 2024, San Francisco could have another homegrown ace to pair with Logan Webb for years to come.

Prospect to watch in 2024: OF/RHP Bryce Eldridge (No. 4) The Giants drafted Eldridge as a two-way player in July, though the 19-year-old made his professional debut exclusively as a hitter, batting an eye-popping .294/.400/.505 with six home runs over 31 games between the Rookie-level ACL Giants and Single-A San Jose in 2023. Many scouts believe Eldridge has more upside with the bat, but he also topped out at 96 mph on the mound in high school, so it will be interesting to see how the Giants map out his development plan in his first full year of pro ball.

One prediction for the new year: A Giant wins NL Rookie of the Year The Giants haven’t produced a ROY winner since Buster Posey in 2010, but they could be well positioned to end that drought soon. San Francisco graduated 12 prospects to the Majors this past season, many of whom will retain their rookie status heading into 2024. If that young core continues to develop as expected, the Giants could have several ROY candidates on their hands next year, including Lee, Harrison and shortstop Marco Luciano.

The Saddest Bay Area Restaurant Closures of 2023

Welcome to the Year in Eater 2023 — an annual tradition that looks back at the highs, lows, and in-betweens of the San Francisco Bay Area’s restaurant scene. Today, the Bay Area’s top food writers, editors, reporters, and other industry experts share the most disappointing restaurant closures of the year.Madeline Wells, senior food reporter at SFGATE: Probably the most high-profile one of the y...

Welcome to the Year in Eater 2023 an annual tradition that looks back at the highs, lows, and in-betweens of the San Francisco Bay Area’s restaurant scene. Today, the Bay Area’s top food writers, editors, reporters, and other industry experts share the most disappointing restaurant closures of the year.

Madeline Wells, senior food reporter at SFGATE: Probably the most high-profile one of the year also hit the hardest: Anchor Brewing. Still doesn’t feel real!

Paolo Bicchieri, Eater SF reporter: Malibu’s on Piedmont Avenue was the closing wherein I got the news, gasped, cursed, then texted my wife. The vegan burgers and shakes, namely the ube chocolate shake, gave me so much life. The business isn’t gone for good, I hope, as the Bay might not be able to go on without an order of Hella Hella Fries every once in a while.

Elena Kadvany, San Francisco Chronicle food reporter: So many this year that it’s hard to say (I desperately miss Berkeley’s Pie Society) but I’d have to say Queens in San Francisco. The Korean business defined definition — was it a “superette”? A restaurant? A wine bar? All of the above? I think often of Queens’ large-as-a-plate haemul buchu jeon (seafood pancake), superlative tomato kimchi, and shelves full of treats imported from Korea by owners Clara Lee and Eddo Kim. Happily, their housemade products are still available in other Bay Area stores, and they’re working on launching a major retail effort.

Kevin Alexander, author of Burn The Ice: The American Culinary Revolution and Its End: There are two different ways to look at this. The first is to say Automat, because I thought the foods Matt Kirk and that crew were doing were absolutely delicious, and the scope of trying to do all elements in-house and keep the price point as accessible as they could was a worthy goal, and the pedigree behind it was ridiculous. So to see that still fail, mostly because the numbers just don’t add up for a place like that in a city like San Francisco is a bummer.

The second is to say Piperade. This is for the exact opposite reasons. It was open 22 years and chef Hirigoyen says he just wanted to retire, and I’m sure that’s all true, but any time a restaurant has that sort of run and closes its doors, I worry that there won’t be another Piperade coming in behind it, able to sustain the same sort of run. It’s a magical thing and it can’t be taken for granted. Plus, it’s not like the city is teeming with Basque restaurants.

Lauren Saria, Eater SF editor: I was so surprised and saddened at the closure of Chezchez on Valencia in February. I loved that bar — with its spritzes, martinis, and all-day blood marys — from the day it opened.

Intu-on Kornnawong, chef and partner at Jo’s Modern Thai: Hearing about the closure of Turtle tower was really disheartening. It’s one of my favorite Vietnamese restaurants in SF. We’re also friends of the owners.

Andrew Calisterio, photographer based in Sacramento: Simon’s in Midtown Sacramento recently announced that they’re closing. It’s one of those legacy places with a fun bar, great food, and every walk of life Sacramento has to offer.

Dianne de Guzman, Eater SF deputy editor: It is the East Bay restaurant closures that crushed me the most, especially as an East Bay dweller who spends her off time at these restaurants. Le Cheval was the spot for family dinners when I was a teen, for instance; Palmetto was a new-to-me-favorite from the Kon-Tiki folks. Sister became my daytime go-to around the lake, while Longbranch was just a Berkeley-San Pablo Avenue mainstay. The East Bay restaurant scene is a vibrant one, but it dims a bit with every closure. I know not everything can stay, but … I wish it didn’t have to feel this terrible.

Josh Decolongon, audience engagement producer (and host of “No Crumbs”) at KQED Food: Although not technically restaurants per se, the closures of La Cocina Marketplace and Anchor Brewing Co. really bummed me out.

Astrid Kane, senior editor at the San Francisco Standard: In fairness to the question, Anchor Brewing wasn’t a restaurant — although it had a taproom that served food! — but losing our eternal icon of craft brewing because some union-hating conglomerate got bored with it from across the ocean was a dagger to the heart. And Hawker Fare’s closure in January was such a bummer, too.

Game Preview: Warriors vs. Miami Heat - 12/28/23

Warriors Host Defending Eastern Conference Champs Amidst Eight-Game Home Winning StreakWARRIORS BEGIN SEVEN-GAME HOMESTAND AGAINST HEATThe Warriors return to Chase Center riding an eight-game home winning streak into a seven-game homestand beginning against the Miami Heat on Thursday. The Heat have won their previous three contests, including beating the Philadelphia 76ers on Christmas Day. The Heat are also the reigning Eastern Conference Champions, losing to the Denver Nuggets 4-1 in the 2023 NBA Finals, meaning t...

Warriors Host Defending Eastern Conference Champs Amidst Eight-Game Home Winning Streak

WARRIORS BEGIN SEVEN-GAME HOMESTAND AGAINST HEATThe Warriors return to Chase Center riding an eight-game home winning streak into a seven-game homestand beginning against the Miami Heat on Thursday. The Heat have won their previous three contests, including beating the Philadelphia 76ers on Christmas Day. The Heat are also the reigning Eastern Conference Champions, losing to the Denver Nuggets 4-1 in the 2023 NBA Finals, meaning the Dubs will be playing the two recent NBA finalists in consecutive games.

Warriors vs. HeatDec. 28 | Tipoff: 7:00 p.m.WATCH: local (NBCSBA), national (NBATV)LISTEN: 95.7 The Game, Warriors Mobile App and Warriors Radio NetworkBUY TICKETS

LAST TIME OUTThe Warriors had their five-game winning streak snapped by the defending champion Nuggets 120-114 in Denver on Christmas Day. The Dubs had three reserves in double-figures, paced by Andrew Wiggins, who scored a team-high 22 points on 7-for-11 shooting. Jamal Murray (28 points) and Nikola Jokic (26 points) combined for 54 points for the Nuggets, while Jokic set an NBA Christmas Day record by shooting a perfect 18-for-18 from the free throw line. » Full Game Recap

MATCHUP AT A GLANCE

UNIFORMSGSW: Statement EditionMIA: Association Edition

PREVIOUS GAME STARTERSGSW: Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Brandin Podziemksi, Jonathan Kuminga and Kevon LooneyMIA: Kyle Lowry, Tyler Herro, Jaime Jaquez Jr., Caleb Martin and Bam Adebayo

INJURY & ROSTER NOTESGSW: Draymond Green (league suspension) is out. Team NotesMIA: TBD. Team Notes

MAKING THE MOST OF UPCOMING HOMESTANDAfter starting 1-6 at home, the Warriors have rattled off eight consecutive wins at Chase Center. Over that span, Stephen Curry is leading the way by averaging 31.4 points per game on 54.8 percent from the field, 50.0 percent from three and 90.7 percent from the foul line. Hovering around .500 for much of the season, Curry views the upcoming stretch as very important to make some headway in the standings.

"It’s huge because it’ll hopefully give us some breathing room," Curry said. "I know we play some good teams, but it’ll give us an opportunity to establish our identity. We took advantage of our previous home stretch and we gotta do it again."

TEAM LEADERS

MIAMI SCOUTING REPORTThe Miami Heat welcomed back two key pieces, Bam Adebayo and Tyler Herro, over the past few games. Adebayo leads the team in rebounds (9.9 RPG) and blocks (1.0 BPG), while Herro is their leading scorer (24.0 PPG). Since their joint return on Dec. 18, Herro has averaged 26.3 points per game, 6.0 rebounds per game and 4.0 assists per game on 48.1 percent from the field and 45.7 percent from behind the arc, while Adebayo has averaged 21.0 points per game, 9.8 rebounds per game, 4.8 assists, 1.1 steals and 1.0 block. Reigning Eastern Conference Finals MVP Jimmy Butler has missed the last three games due to a calf injury, which will be something to monitor heading into Thursday's contest. The Heat's offensive specialty this season has been their perimeter shooting, hitting a league-best 39.5 percent of their 3-point attempts.

S.F. tax on empty homes faces legal challenge

A tax approved last year by San Francisco voters on thousands of vacant homes in the city now faces a legal challenge by real estate groups after a judge declined to dismiss their lawsuit.The Empty Homes Tax, Proposition M in November 2022, is intended to encourage owners to make apartments available to would-be tenants while raising funds for the city to provide affordable housing. The ...

A tax approved last year by San Francisco voters on thousands of vacant homes in the city now faces a legal challenge by real estate groups after a judge declined to dismiss their lawsuit.

The Empty Homes Tax, Proposition M in November 2022, is intended to encourage owners to make apartments available to would-be tenants while raising funds for the city to provide affordable housing. The measure passed with 54% of the vote.

Starting in April 2025, taxes are to be collected from owners of buildings with three or more units that are vacant for more than 182 days in a tax year. Initial taxes will be from $2,500 to $5,000 a year per empty unit, based on its size, and the levies are due to increase up to $20,000 per unit in future years. It does not apply to individual homes, leased properties or homes intended for tourists and other travelers.

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The state has required San Francisco to oversee construction of 82,000 new homes by 2031, of which more than half would serve very low to moderate-income households. City officials say Prop. M will raise more than $20 million a year in housing revenue and will also lead to nearly 5,000 apartment units being occupied within two years.

But property owners contend Prop. M. violates their right to keep their property vacant and is an unconstitutional confiscation of their property. The suit was filed in February by the San Francisco Apartment Association, the San Francisco Association of Realtors, the Small Property Owners of San Francisco Institute and four individual owners.

“The measure seeks to coerce owners to rent their units by severely penalizing those who exercise their rights to keep units vacant (or even those who are trying but are unable to rent a unit for any reason),” lawyers for the property groups argued in a court filing.

City Attorney David Chiu has not yet replied to the claim that Prop. M is invalid, but argued instead that the suit is premature because the tax has not yet been imposed.

“California courts have consistently rejected taxpayers’ attempts to challenge taxes before they are due and requires taxpayers to pay the contested tax” before contesting it in court, Chiu’s office said in a court filing.

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Superior Court Judge Charles Haines disagreed.

The property owners “may obtain a declaration on (the) essential validity of the tax without payment of the not-yet-accrued tax,” Haines said in a ruling Dec. 20 that allowed the suit to proceed. He told Chiu’s office to file a response to the owners’ legal arguments by Jan. 12.

Reach Bob Egelko: begelko@sfchronicle.com; Twitter: @BobEgelko

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